Walking across the Sydney Harbour Bridge

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is one of Australia’s most well-known gems, a historical beauty which brings people flocking from all around the world to see and experience.

Yet what true-blue Aussies don’t realise is, the Harbour Bridge is not just for tourists. Oh, no, no, no. We (and people around the world) often take for granted what is deemed our countries “tourist attraction” and never bother giving it a second look.

For Aussies, the Harbour Bridge sits above the beautiful Circular Quay and just opposite Sydney’s stunning Opera House. Below is the rush of Sydney’s iconic ferries, sail-boats and glistening tanzanite water that would spark a sense of wonder and beauty inside anybody who witnesses it.

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So why don’t we ever think about walking across the Harbour Bridge when we are considering what to do on a beautiful Sunday day, for example? Our tourist attraction is not just for tourists. Just like the Trevi Fountain is not just for Italian locals. Or the Eiffel Tower just for Parisians. Natives of the country should be able to experience the beauty as well.

And that’s exactly what this young lady did. With her darling grandfather.

It’s truly a majestical walk. It only takes about 20 minutes to half an hour, depending how idly you walk and how much time you take to look down below and take in all of Sydney’s cultural beauty. Though the bridge was built in 1932, it still stands sturdy and proud (albeit the slight shaking when a train or truck drives across the bridge).

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It’s the perfect way for Aussies and tourists alike to spend the day. Start the morning with an idle walk across the bridge and then have a lazy lunch over at Milson’s Point (which is where the bridge ends). There are plenty of great eateries in Milson’s Point as well as local pubs and patisseries. After lunch, stroll back across the bridge and back into the Quay.

Or, if you’re anything like my grandfather, stop and adopt two tourists from Austen, Texas and proceed to tell them Sydney’s abundant history. Thankfully, they were happy to listen. Spending time in Sydney’s most well-known destinations is a great way to meet people from overseas, swap stories and be able to share a little piece of your home with them.

Once you’ve said goodbye to your adopted tourists, spend some time walking around the Quay. Witness one of the cruise ships that so often dock in Sydney’s glorious Harbour. Then, walk across to the Opera House and pull a Rocky, running up the stairs, pumping your fists at your triumph!

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Sydney is a beautiful destination, not just for travellers but for locals alike. I think we all too often forget that what is a deemed tourist attraction to people from overseas, is our local attraction that should not be forgotten and should be loved and explored.

And that goes for everyone.

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17 thoughts on “Walking across the Sydney Harbour Bridge

    • You will have to come back then! :) I did the climb a few years ago – I thought it would be so scary but it’s honestly so amazing and the view at the top is inspiring. Do both WHEN (not if!) you come back to Sydney :)

  1. Thanks for this beautiful “backyard” journey across your bridge. I had not realized there was a bridge over the bay so close to the Opera House that could be walked across. Would love to see Australia but I hate flying. :(

    • It truly is beautiful! Oh, I hate flying too but can’t wait to explore the world! Flying shouldn’t stop you – you can always take some tablets to knock you out ;) Or drink some gin and tonic which is what I do! haha x

  2. I was in Sydney twice last year (I lived in Melbourne at the time) and yet never managed my time efficiently enough to squeeze this experience in! Now I have further confirmation that I simply must return one day… :)

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